Lose Your Mother

Lose Your Mother Author Saidiya Hartman
ISBN-10 9781429966900
Year 2008-01-22
Pages 288
Language en
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux
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In Lose Your Mother, Saidiya Hartman journeys along a slave route in Ghana, following the trail of captives from the hinterland to the Atlantic coast. She retraces the history of the Atlantic slave trade from the fifteenth to the twentieth century and reckons with the blank slate of her own genealogy. There were no survivors of Hartman's lineage, nor far-flung relatives in Ghana of whom she had come in search. She traveled to Ghana in search of strangers. The most universal definition of the slave is a stranger—torn from kin and country. To lose your mother is to suffer the loss of kin, to forget your past, and to inhabit the world as a stranger. As both the offspring of slaves and an American in Africa, Hartman, too, was a stranger. Her reflections on history and memory unfold as an intimate encounter with places—a holding cell, a slave market, a walled town built to repel slave raiders—and with people: an Akan prince who granted the Portuguese permission to build the first permanent trading fort in West Africa; an adolescent boy who was kidnapped while playing; a fourteen-year-old girl who was murdered aboard a slave ship. Eloquent, thoughtful, and deeply affecting, Lose Your Mother is a powerful meditation on history, memory, and the Atlantic slave trade.

Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women

Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women Author Mia E. Bay
ISBN-10 9781469620923
Year 2015-04-13
Pages 320
Language en
Publisher UNC Press Books
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Despite recent advances in the study of black thought, black women intellectuals remain often neglected. This collection of essays by fifteen scholars of history and literature establishes black women's places in intellectual history by engaging the work of writers, educators, activists, religious leaders, and social reformers in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean. Dedicated to recovering the contributions of thinkers marginalized by both their race and their gender, these essays uncover the work of unconventional intellectuals, both formally educated and self-taught, and explore the broad community of ideas in which their work participated. The end result is a field-defining and innovative volume that addresses topics ranging from religion and slavery to the politicized and gendered reappraisal of the black female body in contemporary culture. Contributors are Mia E. Bay, Judith Byfield, Alexandra Cornelius, Thadious Davis, Corinne T. Field, Arlette Frund, Kaiama L. Glover, Farah J. Griffin, Martha S. Jones, Natasha Lightfoot, Sherie Randolph, Barbara D. Savage, Jon Sensbach, Maboula Soumahoro, and Cheryl Wall.

Slavery and the Culture of Taste

Slavery and the Culture of Taste Author Simon Gikandi
ISBN-10 9781400840113
Year 2011-08-01
Pages 392
Language en
Publisher Princeton University Press
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It would be easy to assume that, in the eighteenth century, slavery and the culture of taste--the world of politeness, manners, and aesthetics--existed as separate and unequal domains, unrelated in the spheres of social life. But to the contrary, Slavery and the Culture of Taste demonstrates that these two areas of modernity were surprisingly entwined. Ranging across Britain, the antebellum South, and the West Indies, and examining vast archives, including portraits, period paintings, personal narratives, and diaries, Simon Gikandi illustrates how the violence and ugliness of enslavement actually shaped theories of taste, notions of beauty, and practices of high culture, and how slavery's impurity informed and haunted the rarified customs of the time. Gikandi focuses on the ways that the enslavement of Africans and the profits derived from this exploitation enabled the moment of taste in European--mainly British--life, leading to a transformation of bourgeois ideas regarding freedom and selfhood. He explores how these connections played out in the immense fortunes made in the West Indies sugar colonies, supporting the lavish lives of English barons and altering the ideals that defined middle-class subjects. Discussing how the ownership of slaves turned the American planter class into a new aristocracy, Gikandi engages with the slaves' own response to the strange interplay of modern notions of freedom and the realities of bondage, and he emphasizes the aesthetic and cultural processes developed by slaves to create spaces of freedom outside the regimen of enforced labor and truncated leisure. Through a close look at the eighteenth century's many remarkable documents and artworks, Slavery and the Culture of Taste sets forth the tensions and contradictions entangling a brutal practice and the distinctions of civility.

Twelve Years a Slave

Twelve Years a Slave Author Solomon Northup
ISBN-10 9783492967082
Year 2014-02-17
Pages 288
Language de
Publisher Piper Verlag
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Solomon Northup war ein freier Bürger, bis er von Sklavenhändlern verschleppt und an einen Plantagenbesitzer verkauft wurde. Dort lebte er zwölf Jahre als Sklave, bis er schließlich – als einer der wenigen – seine Freiheit zurückerlangen und zu seiner Familie zurückkehren konnte. Die gleichnamige Verfilmung seiner Memoiren von Regisseur Steve McQueen hat bei der Verleihung der Golden Globes den Hauptpreis als bestes Filmdrama gewonnen.

Faithful Bodies

Faithful Bodies Author Heather Miyano Kopelson
ISBN-10 9781479852345
Year 2014-07-18
Pages 416
Language en
Publisher NYU Press
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In the seventeenth-century English Atlantic, religious beliefs and practices played a central role in creating racial identity. English Protestantism provided a vocabulary and structure to describe and maintain boundaries between insider and outsider. In this path-breaking study, Heather Miyano Kopelson peels back the layers of conflicting definitions of bodies and competing practices of faith in the puritan Atlantic, demonstrating how the categories of “white,” “black,” and “Indian” developed alongside religious boundaries between “Christian” and “heathen” and between “Catholic” and “Protestant.” Faithful Bodies focuses on three communities of Protestant dissent in the Atlantic World: Bermuda, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. In this “puritan Atlantic,” religion determined insider and outsider status: at times Africans and Natives could belong as long as they embraced the Protestant faith, while Irish Catholics and English Quakers remained suspect. Colonists’ interactions with indigenous peoples of the Americas and with West Central Africans shaped their understandings of human difference and its acceptable boundaries. Prayer, religious instruction, sexual behavior, and other public and private acts became markers of whether or not blacks and Indians were sinning Christians or godless heathens. As slavery became law, transgressing people of color counted less and less as sinners in English puritans’ eyes, even as some of them made Christianity an integral part of their communities. As Kopelson shows, this transformation proceeded unevenly but inexorably during the long seventeenth century.

Transatlantik

Transatlantik Author Colum McCann
ISBN-10 9783644037014
Year 2014-03-07
Pages 384
Language de
Publisher Rowohlt Verlag GmbH
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Neufundland, 1919: Die beiden Flieger Jack Alcock und Arthur Brown unternehmen den ersten Nonstopflug über den Atlantik mit Kurs Irland. Dublin, 1845: Der schwarzamerikanische Abolitionist Frederick Douglass reist durch das von Hungersnot gepeinigte Irland, wo die Leute schlimmer leiden als unter der Sklaverei. New York, 1998: US-Senator George Mitchell verlässt seine junge Frau und sein erst wenige Tage altes Baby, um in Belfast die Nordirischen Friedensgespräche zu einem unsicheren Abschluss zu führen. «Transatlantik» verwebt drei ikonische historische Momente mit dem Schicksal dreier Frauen: Angefangen mit der irischen Hausmagd Lily Duggan, in der Frederick Douglass die Liebe zur Freiheit weckt, folgt der Roman ihrer Tochter Emily und ihrer Enkelin Lottie in die USA und, später, zurück auf die Insel. Ihr Leben spiegelt den Verlauf der bewegten Nationalgeschichte Irlands und Amerikas. Dabei spielt ein vergessener, über drei Generationen nicht geöffneter Brief eine entscheidende Rolle. «Transatlantik» ist ein kraftvolles Epos über die Kollision von Geschichte und persönlichem Schicksal – geschrieben mit unvergleichlicher dichterischer Intensität, mit leuchtenden Szenen und klingender Sprache.

American Literature s Aesthetic Dimensions

American Literature s Aesthetic Dimensions Author Cindy Weinstein
ISBN-10 9780231520775
Year 2012-07-24
Pages 432
Language en
Publisher Columbia University Press
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In these diverse essays, leading critics recast the place of aesthetics in the production and consumption of literature. Rethinking the category of aesthetics in light of recent developments in literary theory and social criticism, contributors showcase the interpretive possibilities available to those who bring politics, culture, ideology, and conceptions of identity into their critiques. Deploying a distinctive range of methodologies, essays combine close readings of individual works and authors with more theoretical discussions of aesthetic theory and its relation to American literature. An introduction surveys the rise of a literary criticism based in aesthetics from the eighteenth century to its twentieth-century remaking in the wake of deconstruction, identity politics, and new historicism. The editors ultimately argue that aesthetics never really left American literary critique, even in the heyday of new historicism. Instead, they cast the current “return to aesthetics” as the natural consequence of shortcomings in deconstruction and new historicism, which led to a reconfiguration of aesthetics. Subsequent essays demonstrate the value and versatility of aesthetic considerations in literature, from eighteenth-century poetry to twentieth-century popular music. Organized into four groups—politics, form, gender, and theory—they revisit the canonical works of Henry James, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Stephen Crane, introduce the overlooked texts of Constance Fenimore Woolson and Earl Lind, and unpack the surprising complexities of the music of The Carpenters. Deeply rooted in an American context, these essays explore literature’s aesthetic dimensions in connection to American liberty and the formation of political selfhood, and they conclude with the ethical implications of reading and representation.

The Generation of Postmemory

The Generation of Postmemory Author Marianne Hirsch
ISBN-10 9780231526272
Year 2012-07-17
Pages 320
Language en
Publisher Columbia University Press
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Can we remember other people’s memories? The Generation of Postmemory argues we can: that memories of traumatic events live on to mark the lives of those who were not there to experience them. Children of survivors and their contemporaries inherit catastrophic histories not through direct recollection but through haunting postmemories—multiply mediated images, objects, stories, behaviors, and affects passed down within the family and the culture at large. In these new and revised critical readings of the literary and visual legacies of the Holocaust and other, related sites of memory, Marianne Hirsch builds on her influential concept of postmemory. The book’s chapters, two of which were written collaboratively with the historian Leo Spitzer, engage the work of postgeneration artists and writers such as Art Spiegelman, W.G. Sebald, Eva Hoffman, Tatana Kellner, Muriel Hasbun, Anne Karpff, Lily Brett, Lorie Novak, David Levinthal, Nancy Spero and Susan Meiselas. Grappling with the ethics of empathy and identification, these artists attempt to forge a creative postmemorial aesthetic that reanimates the past without appropriating it. In her analyses of their fractured texts, Hirsch locates the roots of the familial and affiliative practices of postmemory in feminism and other movements for social change. Using feminist critical strategies to connect past and present, words and images, and memory and gender, she brings the entangled strands of disparate traumatic histories into more intimate contact. With more than fifty illustrations, her text enables a multifaceted encounter with foundational and cutting edge theories in memory, trauma, gender, and visual culture, eliciting a new understanding of history and our place in it.

Reluctant Witnesses

Reluctant Witnesses Author Arlene Stein
ISBN-10 9780199381920
Year 2014-08-04
Pages 272
Language en
Publisher Oxford University Press
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Americans now learn about the Holocaust in high school, watch films about it on television, and visit museums dedicated to preserving its memory. But for the first two decades following the end of World War II, discussion of the destruction of European Jewry was largely absent from American culture and the tragedy of the Holocaust was generally seen as irrelevant to non-Jewish Americans. Today, the Holocaust is widely recognized as a universal moral touchstone. In Reluctant Witnesses, sociologist Arlene Stein--herself the daughter of a Holocaust survivor--mixes memoir, history, and sociological analysis to tell the story of the rise of Holocaust consciousness in the United States from the perspective of survivors and their descendants. If survivors tended to see Holocaust storytelling as mainly a private affair, their children--who reached adulthood during the heyday of identity politics--reclaimed their hidden family histories and transformed them into public stories. Reluctant Witnesses documents how a group of people who had previously been unrecognized and misunderstood managed to find its voice. It tells this story in relation to the changing status of trauma and victimhood in American culture. At a time when a sense of Holocaust fatigue seems to be setting in and when the remaining survivors are at the end of their lives, it affirms that confronting traumatic memories and catastrophic histories can help us make our world mean something beyond ourselves.

Fear of a Black Nation

Fear of a Black Nation Author David Austin
ISBN-10 9781771130110
Year 2013-05-27
Pages 286
Language en
Publisher Between the Lines
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In the 1960s, for at least a brief moment, Montreal became what seemed an unlikely centre of Black Power and the Caribbean left. In October 1968 the Congress of Black Writers at McGill University brought together well-known Black thinkers and activists from Canada, the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean, people like C.L.R. James, Stokely Carmichael, Miriam Makeba, Rocky Jones, and Walter Rodney. Within months of the Congress, a Black-led protest at Sir George Williams University (now Concordia) exploded on the front pages of newspapers across the country, raising state security fears about Montreal as the new hotbed of international Black radical politics.